• The myth of writing for a living …

    (Or … when good Canadian writers must also sell real estate, and other sad tales of the state of the arts in our country)

    As both an accomplished professional writer, a past successful corporate businesswoman in a few career ladders and now an equally accomplished Realtor, I feel I can speak fairly to the sad state of funding and support for the struggling arts/writing communities in our country.

    What appears to have gone financially wrong for the arts in our Canadian culture is that we value and happily pay for and reward most industries except creatives. Yes, there are financially successful Canadian artists and writers, but the numbers are staggeringly few and the average annual earnings equally minimal. Sadly writers, all creatives in the arts community, are not valued in the social-norm definition of a job or a career choice of respect. Often a fine arts degree, BFA, jokingly referred to as a bachelor of F*ck-All.

    In a past survey posted, The Writers’ Union of Canada (TWUC), is calling it a cultural emergency for Canada, noting writers are working harder while earning less. Their publication, Devaluing Creators, Endangering Creativityalso shows an embarrassing gender gap in writers’ incomes in Canada, with women writers earning just 55% of the income earned by their male counterparts. The report shows a median net income from writing was less than $5,000, while the average income from writing was $12,879. Falling significantly below the average Canadian income of $49,000. at the time of the report.

    TWUC predicts that “If writers continue to be compensated for their work at these low rates it will inevitably become impossible for professionals in the field to earn a living. With revenues from writing that fall below the poverty line, writers will increasingly abandon the sector for other employment … A decline in the number of writers will affect the quality and depth of materials available to Canadians as well as to the $1.9 billion book publishing industry which relies entirely on the work of writers.”

    I view this not as just a business model downfall but a general society attitude problem. I personally have had many kudos and respect for my business success through a few major corporate career paths, but a comparable lack of respect or equitable payment for my published paid freelance, with an even lesser lack of earnings for my published creative writing work.

    I worry about what happens to a country which does not value a creative community through supporting the arts. Everyone enjoys a great Netflix series, an inspiring gallery outing, a concert, theatre and especially a good book, yet most do not consider the creative processes in play to bring that enjoyment to their personal experiences. A corporate board room brings a high regard to those who sit around the big table with little notice to the artist whose work hangs on the wall in that very room. Pre meeting casual chit chat of the last show watched, or great book read brings rare mention of the skilled writer behind their enjoyment. The magazines on newsstands country-wide are heavily consumed with little revenue to the writer. 

    The attitude that creatives are hobbyists is alarmingly out of balance with the respect of professionals in most other industries. Speaking from my own personal experience when a hard-working creative published writer puts that career path on hold to sell real estate in order to pay the basic household bills, there is something fundamentally out of balance in the social attitude and elected voice in this country.

    The disregard and lack of support for the creative community to earn a living wage is why Canada will continue to have so many stories go unwritten, art never imagined, and sadly creative energy never tapped.

    #SupportLocalBusiness #SupportCanadianContent #CreativesMatter


  • my 2020 hindsight ...

    I am not certain why 2020 seemed like a personal hit as I know we all felt it in our own ways. In reflection it turns out it was both one of my best and one of my worst years ever. It was, for me, a year of yin and yang. For every action there was a positive reaction.
    My husband started the year off losing his dependable job of 35+ years / I ended the year with record breaking earnings.
    There was no far away beach and sun travel on the agenda / we bought a travel trailer and enjoyed our own beautiful part of the world we live in.  
    I missed our kids and their families dearly / our grown kids proved to be wonderful hard working family units each thriving in their own homes and personal family time (what we hoped we taught them was important and that it is all about family, turned out to be true).
    I put in endless hours of work time / I managed more creative time this past year than ever with dedicated time to write, create, paint and more.
    I missed the social side of life / I feel more connected to that which is dear to me.
    My health challenge was paramount given the focus on underlying conditions and risks / I have practiced razor sharp focus resulting in one of my healthiest years.
    I lost my mother this past fall / I have gained a new tighter closeness with my brothers and sister.
    It was a year of lessons in glass half full or glass half empty. For me it was both and how I approached the moment/day/week/month/year was a lesson in patience. When the negative showed up, I strived to sit tight, ride it out and wait for the counter reaction of the positive. I learned it always shows up if you give it time and are watching for it.
    Uncertainty has become the new normal, but the reality is it should always have been the norm. This past year of upheaval, change, re-focusing, priority shifting, and the future unknown is in the simplest of terms a big reality check. All we really have is the moment. We can lament the past and plan the future, but nothing is as relevant as today.



    Happy New Year!
    Michelle


  • Begin again ...

    Excuse my lack of blogging for a very long time but life has been extremely intertwined but finally feeling enough distance between my writing life, my realtor life and my personal life.  I can again feel comfortable being opinionated. I enjoy writing with a know-it-all abandon as I am at that point in my life that I don’t care what anyone thinks of my side of any story. I write because it is who I am. I am an observer, a story teller, a word-girl.

    I have come to learn that I am somewhat of a guide to many I cross paths with. I don't have all the answers, but I do listen to all the questions. That alone seems to bring a go-to role into my daily life be it work, family, personal and more. I take my small part in the world seriously, I don't have all the answers, in fact I don't know if I have any answers, but it seems people bring me questions and the discussions are always worthy. 

    On the flip side of people voicing questions and my sometimes overly-logical unemotional path through a discussion to find an answer, I also find myself with my own life-questions. Writing brings me an understanding into self, how and why I think a certain way and a path to my own personal truth. Take it or leave it, agree or disagree, comment or hit delete. Landing on my words may somehow be a path to your own personal truth as is the writing process a path that leads to mine.



Website Created & Hosted by Doteasy Web Hosting Canada